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With his more than sixty prizewinning recordings, Michael Korstick has gained renown as one of Germany's leading pianists. And now, with his new recording of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti, he again sets accents and interpretive standards. The score texts, especially as far as ornamentation is concerned, often cannot be written out with precision or brought into systematic agreement in parallel passages. Much in these score texts creates the impression of a sketch and practically invites the player to make individual decisions. An improvisational element is proper to all the pieces; no sonata follows a predictable course apart from the fact that they as a rule consist of two parts, each of which is repeated. There are many characteristics in Scarlatti's music that immediately catch the ear's attention: wit, generosity, keen understanding, irony, sensibility, and not least a healthy portion of the self-confidence forming a super-virtuoso's sine qua non. The combination of the most sophisticated techniques, some of them acrobatic, with extremely catchy thematic material is characteristic of Scarlatti's sonatas, but what never fails to astonish us is also his capacity for lyrical introspection in it's most various manifestations, from the greatest sorrow through the profoundest mourning to meditative absorption. Again, other pieces imitate the sounds of instruments so very different as flutes, oboes, trumpets, horns, guitars, mandolins, castanets, and drums. This recording presents in full the thirty-two sonatas of the Auswahlband IV of the G. Henle Verlag as well as four of Scarlatti's most beloved sonatas, which have been published separately by the G. Henle Verlag. The selection of pieces for Band IV has at it's goal the presentation of what may be described as the essence or "The Best of" Scarlatti's art of invention.
With his more than sixty prizewinning recordings, Michael Korstick has gained renown as one of Germany's leading pianists. And now, with his new recording of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti, he again sets accents and interpretive standards. The score texts, especially as far as ornamentation is concerned, often cannot be written out with precision or brought into systematic agreement in parallel passages. Much in these score texts creates the impression of a sketch and practically invites the player to make individual decisions. An improvisational element is proper to all the pieces; no sonata follows a predictable course apart from the fact that they as a rule consist of two parts, each of which is repeated. There are many characteristics in Scarlatti's music that immediately catch the ear's attention: wit, generosity, keen understanding, irony, sensibility, and not least a healthy portion of the self-confidence forming a super-virtuoso's sine qua non. The combination of the most sophisticated techniques, some of them acrobatic, with extremely catchy thematic material is characteristic of Scarlatti's sonatas, but what never fails to astonish us is also his capacity for lyrical introspection in it's most various manifestations, from the greatest sorrow through the profoundest mourning to meditative absorption. Again, other pieces imitate the sounds of instruments so very different as flutes, oboes, trumpets, horns, guitars, mandolins, castanets, and drums. This recording presents in full the thirty-two sonatas of the Auswahlband IV of the G. Henle Verlag as well as four of Scarlatti's most beloved sonatas, which have been published separately by the G. Henle Verlag. The selection of pieces for Band IV has at it's goal the presentation of what may be described as the essence or "The Best of" Scarlatti's art of invention.
761203547326

Details

Format: CD
Label: CPO RECORDS
Rel. Date: 01/14/2022
UPC: 761203547326

More Info:

With his more than sixty prizewinning recordings, Michael Korstick has gained renown as one of Germany's leading pianists. And now, with his new recording of sonatas by Domenico Scarlatti, he again sets accents and interpretive standards. The score texts, especially as far as ornamentation is concerned, often cannot be written out with precision or brought into systematic agreement in parallel passages. Much in these score texts creates the impression of a sketch and practically invites the player to make individual decisions. An improvisational element is proper to all the pieces; no sonata follows a predictable course apart from the fact that they as a rule consist of two parts, each of which is repeated. There are many characteristics in Scarlatti's music that immediately catch the ear's attention: wit, generosity, keen understanding, irony, sensibility, and not least a healthy portion of the self-confidence forming a super-virtuoso's sine qua non. The combination of the most sophisticated techniques, some of them acrobatic, with extremely catchy thematic material is characteristic of Scarlatti's sonatas, but what never fails to astonish us is also his capacity for lyrical introspection in it's most various manifestations, from the greatest sorrow through the profoundest mourning to meditative absorption. Again, other pieces imitate the sounds of instruments so very different as flutes, oboes, trumpets, horns, guitars, mandolins, castanets, and drums. This recording presents in full the thirty-two sonatas of the Auswahlband IV of the G. Henle Verlag as well as four of Scarlatti's most beloved sonatas, which have been published separately by the G. Henle Verlag. The selection of pieces for Band IV has at it's goal the presentation of what may be described as the essence or "The Best of" Scarlatti's art of invention.
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