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Bernardo Pasquini (1637-1710) was the harpsichord virtuoso in Rome at the time of Alessandro Scarlatti and Arcangelo Corelli. His 14 sonatas a due cimbali are suitable for virtuoso extemporizing due to their special structure: the composer did not write out the harpsichord part, but only the figured basses, occasionally numbered to indicate the desired harmonies, so that the players are largely free to perform the actual harpsichord part. A real treat for two thoroughbred harpsichordists such as Attilio Cremonesi and Alessandro de Marchi, who were able to give free rein to their unbridled musical and improvisational passion on this recording in 1991.
Bernardo Pasquini (1637-1710) was the harpsichord virtuoso in Rome at the time of Alessandro Scarlatti and Arcangelo Corelli. His 14 sonatas a due cimbali are suitable for virtuoso extemporizing due to their special structure: the composer did not write out the harpsichord part, but only the figured basses, occasionally numbered to indicate the desired harmonies, so that the players are largely free to perform the actual harpsichord part. A real treat for two thoroughbred harpsichordists such as Attilio Cremonesi and Alessandro de Marchi, who were able to give free rein to their unbridled musical and improvisational passion on this recording in 1991.
8424562800380
Pasquini / Cremonesi / Marchi De - Virtuoso Music For Two Harpsichords

Details

Format: CD
Label: GLOSSA
Rel. Date: 08/02/2024
UPC: 8424562800380

Virtuoso Music For Two Harpsichords
Artist: Pasquini / Cremonesi / Marchi De
Format: CD
New: Available $12.99
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Bernardo Pasquini (1637-1710) was the harpsichord virtuoso in Rome at the time of Alessandro Scarlatti and Arcangelo Corelli. His 14 sonatas a due cimbali are suitable for virtuoso extemporizing due to their special structure: the composer did not write out the harpsichord part, but only the figured basses, occasionally numbered to indicate the desired harmonies, so that the players are largely free to perform the actual harpsichord part. A real treat for two thoroughbred harpsichordists such as Attilio Cremonesi and Alessandro de Marchi, who were able to give free rein to their unbridled musical and improvisational passion on this recording in 1991.
        
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